Preparing for the job interview – let’s think about values

Is it really the time try for an Oscar?

So you’ve landed a fantastic job interview.

It’s a great organization and the role you’ve always wanted. You have the experience and you have the qualities they say they need. But can you convince the panel that you are the one they want.

Will they think you will fit in? Now, don’t dismiss this out of hand thinking that demonstrating the right competencies will be enough.

They may never write it down or confess it to you, but their view of your “organization fit”, your compatibility with the organization’s values and their mode of operation, will influence the panel.

Note; I’m not talking here about discrimination on grounds of race or sex, although I do think age discrimination is often an element.

Job interviews and assessment centres give organizations lots of opportunities to find out about you and your values, and whether they think you will fit in. So do reference checks!

How can you prepare to make the right impression?

Well, in my view you, unless you are an actor at Oscar standard, it really isn’t wise to try to fake it! Nor do I think faking it is ethical – but that is something for you to think about.

Before the interview, as part of your research into the company, look at what they stand for and where they are likely to be on the moral issues of the day. Next spend some time thinking about your own moral compass and what you stand for. Then determine whether you are truly a good fit!

If not, then think very seriously about how much you want this particular job and what it really means to you! Clashing values can lead to lots of frustration on both sides.

When you have made you assessment and committed to the interview, think about how to articulate who you are and what you stand for – how to make your values clear in what you say.

I am Wendy Mason and I work as a Personal Development Coach, Consultant and Writer I work with all kinds of people going through many different kinds of personal and career change, particularly those;

  • looking for work
  • looking for promotion or newly promoted
  • moving between Public and Private Sectors
  • facing redundancy
  • moving into retirement

I am very good at helping you sort out what you want, overcome obstacles and handle change.   Email me at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com for more information

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Preparing for the job interview – let’s think about values

Is it really the time try for an Oscar?

So you’ve landed a fantastic job interview.

It’s a great organization and the role you’ve always wanted. You have the experience and you have the qualities they say they need. But can you convince the panel that you are the one they want.

Will they think you will fit in? Now, don’t dismiss this out of hand thinking that demonstrating the right competencies will be enough.

They may never write it down or confess it to you, but their view of your “organization fit”, your compatibility with the organization’s values and their mode of operation, will influence the panel.

Note; I’m not talking here about discrimination on grounds of race or sex, although I do think age discrimination is often an element.

Job interviews and assessment centres give organizations lots of opportunities to find out about you and your values, and whether they think you will fit in. So do reference checks!

How can you prepare to make the right impression?

Well, in my view you, unless you are an actor at Oscar standard, it really isn’t wise to try to fake it! Nor do I think faking it is ethical – but that is something for you to think about.

Before the interview, as part of your research into the company, look at what they stand for and where they are likely to be on the moral issues of the day. Next spend some time thinking about your own moral compass and what you stand for. Then determine whether you are truly a good fit!

If not, then think very seriously about how much you want this particular job and what it really means to you! Clashing values can lead to lots of frustration on both sides.

When you have made you assessment and committed to the interview, think about how to articulate who you are and what you stand for – how to make your values clear in what you say.

I am Wendy Mason and I work as a Personal Development Coach, Consultant and Writer I work with all kinds of people going through many different kinds of personal and career change, particularly those;

  • looking for work
  • looking for promotion or newly promoted
  • moving between Public and Private Sectors
  • facing redundancy
  • moving into retirement

I am very good at helping you sort out what you want, overcome obstacles and handle change.   Email me at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com for more information

Share