Tag Archives: ethics

Job Search and Personal Values

c5Job Search and Personal Values

Sometimes these days job search seems to take such a long time that when you do find something that looks a good in terms of role, other considerations go out of the window. This can be dangerous.

So you’ve seen this advert for a wonderful job. It is just what you have been looking for the last three months.

It’s a global organization that is doing well in the current market and the part of the organization you are considering is expanding. You have the skills, knowledge and experience they are asking for.

So where is that doubt at the back of your mind coming from – why have you got reservations? Surely at this point you can’t afford not to go for it?

Please pause for a moment and take a few deep breaths. Now sit quietly and think about what is really troubling you. Might it by any chance be about fitting in?

You have been around long enough to know that getting a job is usually about more than simply demonstrating the right competencies. You know there will be some unwritten rules they will apply that have to do with what they regard as your “organizational fit!” Note; I’m not talking here about discrimination on grounds of race or sex, although I do think age discrimination is often an element.

This is about your compatibility and how their conception of the organization’s values and their mode of operation will influence the panel. You know that scrutiny at job interviews and possibly an assessment centre is going to give them lots of opportunity to find out about you and your values, and whether they think you are right for them. And of course if that doesn’t provide all they need what about the reference checks?

How can you prepare to make to make the most of the opportunity and get that job? Well, in my view you, unless you are an actor at Oscar standard, it really isn’t wise to try to fake it! Nor do I think faking it is ethical – but that is something for you to think about.

But, as you are a wise job seeker, you will be researching the company before you get to interview stage. You will look at what they stand for and how they interact with the environment outside the organization. You can also find out something about their operating model and how they treat their staff – this is where having a wide network of contacts is a real advantage.

Then spend some time thinking about what you need to help you succeed in a job. Most of us need to have some belief in an organization’s purpose and vision to feel comfortable. Moral compass sounds a very old fashioned expression but it really does matter that you understand your own values and what you stand for. Is your moral compass compatible with theirs? If not, what is working with them going to do your self esteem?

Do you now think this is truly a good fit! Has that uncomfortable feeling gone away or got stronger? Think very seriously about how much you want this particular job and what it really means to you! Clashing values can lead to lots of frustration on both sides.

When you have made your assessment and committed to the interview, think about how to articulate who you are and what you stand for – how to make your values clear in what you say.

Wendy Mason is the The Career Coach – helping you to find fresh perspectives on your Job Search and Career. She helps you work towards your goals and aspirations, in a way that fits in with both work and home life. Email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com,  find her on Skype at wendymason14, or call +44 (0) 2081239146 (02081239146 for UK callers) or +1 262 317 9016 if you are in the US.

A free trial/consultation allows you to try phone coaching from the comfort of your own home and without risk. Don’t forget to ask about the Summer Special Offer 

Problems at work or at home? Why not try my free 30 Minute Trial Coaching Session/mQqLO fb.me/2ow.lyYOXSQyJQ

 

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LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT; ACTING WITH INTEGRITY

Integrity

Integrity

Dictionary Definition;

1. Steadfast adherence to a strict moral or ethical code.

2. The state of being unimpaired; soundness.

3. The quality or condition of being whole or undivided; completeness.

“I have found that being honest is the best technique I can use. Right up front, tell people what you’re trying to accomplish and what you’re willing to sacrifice to accomplish it.” – Lee Iacocca


The most effective way to behave in work and business (including large banks), as in life, is to act with integrity.  Note the definitions above which talk about wholeness, soundness and completeness – this is a definition of health?

That means being as honest as you can and being fair.  As Lee Iacocca says, tell your team the truth and tell them what you are doing about it.  Be a model for honesty, openness and fairness and show that you expect all in your team to follow

Be as realistic as you can about the risks    When you can, help your staff prepare for bad news.  But combine all of this with being scrupulously fair.  They will know if you play the favorites game or, for example, take the opportunity to pay off old scores if you have to  lay people off or reduce hours.  You will lose good will and that extra contribution you need from those who stay.

In the good times share bonuses fairly and for good reasons – nothing is more de-motivating than seeing a colleague who doesn’t really deserve it, getting a bonus. If the bonuses you pay will not stand up to public scrutiny – don’t pay them.

There are major advantages in acting with integrity in all parts of the business in  terms of competitive advantage.

  • The public, and that means your customers, are increasingly concerned about ethical standards
  • Customers and good staff are more like to be attracted and retained
  • Shareholders are more likely to invest in those they trust, now more than ever
  • Staff and your own morale will be higher
  • Your reputation will be something you can be proud of
  • (At its crudest) You stay out of jail and believe me in old age, the money will not make up for the shame.

Here are some ideas for acting with integrity! If you can’t get your head round it, hire someone to advise you on good governance – there are plenty of us around and it isn’t hard to put it in place.

Some principles for making decisions with integrity!

  1. Make sure those in management know how to step back from every critical decision before they make it and look at it objectively.
  2. Understand the risks in your own culture.  Monitor those likely to get swept along by excitement or urgency to the point where they lose judgment .   Personal power, ‘winning’, strategic plotting, high drama, etc. feel good – they are exciting – but they rarely lead to real long-term business advantage
  3. Strive for fairness and the long-term, and not short-term polarized ‘winner takes all’ outcomes that threaten the organization’s long-term survival.
  4. Learn from history and earlier situations. Reviewing how previous situations were handled, reduces the risks of making daft mistakes:  Also history is a superb store of already invented wheels, which can often save you the time and agonies of trying unsuccessfully to invent a new one.
  5. Understand the long-term consequences.  You need to build in time, and structures, to think through what these might be. Try to make sure there are no unforeseen consequences which work to your, and other people’s,  detriment. Ask;
    1.  What do I get out of this? If you directly address how you benefit it’s easier to spot biases and blind spots.
    2. If we do this, what will happen? Play out the effects of the  decision. Be alert to the impact on stakeholders you may not have considered.
  6. Make sure what you do is legal, but think about the spirit of the law as well as the words.  No one really respects or trusts someone who is known to “bend” the law and that includes your customers and share holders
  7. Consult widely -  not just your staff, but your customers, if you can,
  8. Above all, resist the delusion and arrogance that power and authority tends to foster. This is especially important to guard against if you live and work in a protected, insulated or isolated situation, as many large-scale leaders and decision-makers tend to do. Being a leader for a long time, or for any duration in a culture of arrogance, privilege and advantage, provides great nourishment for personal delusion. Many unethical decisions come from arrogance and delusion. Guard against becoming so dangerous.

Acting with integrity doesn’t just help you to sleep at nights but you also stand a chance of leaving a real legacy – someone who is remembered and respected in your community and beyond for a very long time!

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

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The Leader’s Way: Business, Buddhism and Happiness in an Interconnected World – Leadership Lessons from the Dalai Lama

Effective leadership is an underlying theme throughout the teachings of the Dalai Lama.

Cover of "The Leader's Way: Business, Bud...

International managerial consultant Laurens van den Muyzenberg identified the business leadership undercurrent in the 1990s after he was hired to advise the Dalai Lama.

Realizing the great potential in combining their respective expertise, van den Muyzenberg and the Dalai Lama co-authored The Leader’s Way, applying Buddhism to business practices.

“Most of my clients do face difficult ethical problems,” says van den Muyzenberg, who consults leaders. “It’s hard to find somebody with the kind of ethical prestige that [the Dalai Lama] has.”

Professor  C.O. Herkströter, former CEO of Shell and Chairman of the Board of ING wrote this when reviewing the book.

“This book examines capitalism and Buddhism in a fascinating way. Everybody in business who is seriously interested in responsible entrepreneurship will recognise the issues. The book adds a valuable dimension to the values and ethical standards that form the basis for responsible leadership in business.”

The approach represents the synthesis of East and West and provides an inspiring manifesto for business change. The first part of The Leader’s Way two-part message is this: in order to lead, you must understand the reasons for our actions then you can act to  solve problems through integrity, respect and sensitivity toward others.

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Preparing for the job interview – let’s think about values

Is it really the time try for an Oscar?

So you’ve landed a fantastic job interview.

It’s a great organization and the role you’ve always wanted. You have the experience and you have the qualities they say they need. But can you convince the panel that you are the one they want.

Will they think you will fit in? Now, don’t dismiss this out of hand thinking that demonstrating the right competencies will be enough.

They may never write it down or confess it to you, but their view of your “organization fit”, your compatibility with the organization’s values and their mode of operation, will influence the panel.

Note; I’m not talking here about discrimination on grounds of race or sex, although I do think age discrimination is often an element.

Job interviews and assessment centres give organizations lots of opportunities to find out about you and your values, and whether they think you will fit in. So do reference checks!

How can you prepare to make the right impression?

Well, in my view you, unless you are an actor at Oscar standard, it really isn’t wise to try to fake it! Nor do I think faking it is ethical – but that is something for you to think about.

Before the interview, as part of your research into the company, look at what they stand for and where they are likely to be on the moral issues of the day. Next spend some time thinking about your own moral compass and what you stand for. Then determine whether you are truly a good fit!

If not, then think very seriously about how much you want this particular job and what it really means to you! Clashing values can lead to lots of frustration on both sides.

When you have made you assessment and committed to the interview, think about how to articulate who you are and what you stand for – how to make your values clear in what you say.

I am Wendy Mason and I work as a Personal Development Coach, Consultant and Writer I work with all kinds of people going through many different kinds of personal and career change, particularly those;

  • looking for work
  • looking for promotion or newly promoted
  • moving between Public and Private Sectors
  • facing redundancy
  • moving into retirement

I am very good at helping you sort out what you want, overcome obstacles and handle change.   Email me at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com for more information

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Preparing for the job interview – let’s think about values

Is it really the time try for an Oscar?

So you’ve landed a fantastic job interview.

It’s a great organization and the role you’ve always wanted. You have the experience and you have the qualities they say they need. But can you convince the panel that you are the one they want.

Will they think you will fit in? Now, don’t dismiss this out of hand thinking that demonstrating the right competencies will be enough.

They may never write it down or confess it to you, but their view of your “organization fit”, your compatibility with the organization’s values and their mode of operation, will influence the panel.

Note; I’m not talking here about discrimination on grounds of race or sex, although I do think age discrimination is often an element.

Job interviews and assessment centres give organizations lots of opportunities to find out about you and your values, and whether they think you will fit in. So do reference checks!

How can you prepare to make the right impression?

Well, in my view you, unless you are an actor at Oscar standard, it really isn’t wise to try to fake it! Nor do I think faking it is ethical – but that is something for you to think about.

Before the interview, as part of your research into the company, look at what they stand for and where they are likely to be on the moral issues of the day. Next spend some time thinking about your own moral compass and what you stand for. Then determine whether you are truly a good fit!

If not, then think very seriously about how much you want this particular job and what it really means to you! Clashing values can lead to lots of frustration on both sides.

When you have made you assessment and committed to the interview, think about how to articulate who you are and what you stand for – how to make your values clear in what you say.

I am Wendy Mason and I work as a Personal Development Coach, Consultant and Writer I work with all kinds of people going through many different kinds of personal and career change, particularly those;

  • looking for work
  • looking for promotion or newly promoted
  • moving between Public and Private Sectors
  • facing redundancy
  • moving into retirement

I am very good at helping you sort out what you want, overcome obstacles and handle change.   Email me at wendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com for more information

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Lessons in Leadership from the Dalai Lama

Tenzin Gyatso, the fourteenth and current Dala...

Recently the Dalai Lama spoke about compassion and global leadership.  He said good leaders today needed to be warm-hearted and practice open communication. With compassion, he believes we gain self-confidence and rid ourselves of our fears. “Then we can have honesty, then we can have trust.”

What does this mean for us in the work place?

If you look at the roots of the word compassion you begin to see how it can apply.  It meant to suffer with!  That has huge implications in the present economic climate doesn’t it?  It means to feel another’s pain.

What a burden that could be if we lead a large organisation.  Does that mean we have to feel the consequence of the every decision we make?  Well yes, I believe we do!  We need to be able to feel it and weigh it in the balance but it should not disable our ability to make hard decisions

A former colleague told me the following story.

“Some years ago I was invited to a funeral.  The person who had died had worked at quite a junior level in my division in a UK government department.  He had loved his job – his whole world had been centred on his work.

But he became ill.   In his role that put the safety of others at risk.  But there wasn’t any other work available for him to do!  It was the time of an earlier round of UK Government cuts. So I made the decision we couldn’t keep him on

He was devastated.  It is probably fair to say he lost the will to live.

I went to his funeral but it was one of the most difficult things I’ve ever done.  I didn’t know what to expect!  But his family were just delighted that a senior manager from the Department had come along.

Did I regret my decision?  No!  Was I pained by that decision?  Yes, deeply!  But then no one said being a senior manager or a leader was always going to be easy.”

The person who told me that story was a well loved, trusted and very effective leader.

Tenzin Gayatso could be the last Dalai Lama, but his message is timeless.


Wendy Mason works as a consultant, business coach and blogger. Adept at problem solving, she is a great person to bring in when that one thing you thought was straightforward turns out not to be! If you have a problem talk to Wendy – she can help you – email her atwendymason@wisewolfconsulting.com or ring ++44(0)7867681439

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The World Needs You! There has never been a better time to be a Transformational Leader

This gallery contains 1 photos.

Transformational and ethical leadership, together with emotional intelligence, are the key factors in emerging leadership culture. There are now real incentives for doing the right thing and real penalties for doing the wrong one. There has never been a better time to be a Transformational Leader! The world has never needed them more! Continue reading

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