Job Search Part 1:What Kind of Work Are You Looking For?

 

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Job Search Part 1:What Kind of Work Are You Looking For?

Are you looking for work?

Well, what kind of work are you looking for? The answer is critical for success in your job search!

You have a decision to make!

So you are looking for work. But perhaps you are not entirely settled yet on the kind of work you want. But the clearer you become about what you want, and the more you know about that kind of work, the simpler your job search becomes. And the more likely it is to be successful.

Deciding on the right kind of role for you is a big decision to make. There is a lot to consider.

Here are some questions to ask yourself.

Is this going to be a career or are you looking for work so that you can pay the bills and keep yourself, and perhaps your family, afloat?

Some people take stop-gap work or decide that, for them, life outside work is where their real satisfaction comes from. They have chosen not to make the commitment that goes into building a career, usually because they have made a very strong commitment to something else. Others are committed to making a career. They want to build on their skills and experience and look for promotion opportunities. But, both may be looking for a new challenge at work or a new environment. Where are you?

What do you really enjoy doing and what do you dislike

We all tend to work best at things we like – what do you enjoy doing? Think about your interests and the things that you have enjoyed doing in the past in both your work and personal life. What kind of environment suits you best? Now look in the mirror and think about what have you disliked doing and what environments have you disliked?

What are you good at?

Take some time to think about what you are really good at and what are your key skills? What do you bring to the party? Now, you need to be really honest with yourself – remember nobody is good at everything. What are you not so good at. It helps to be honest because taking a job that requires you to spend much of your time on things your are not good at, is full of risk, And this includes work which is done just to pay the bills.

Note. Taking a stop-gap role while looking for right opportunity may be a good idea. But if you hate the stop-gap work it may sap the energy and motivation you need to follow up a possible career opening. Perversely, being frustrated and miserable in the day job isn’t always the best place to start a really productive job search.

How do you want to work?

It’s important to decide how you want to work to make sure your search is as accurate as possible. Consider,  for example, whether it is going to be a permanent, employed post or would you take on an interim role “temping” through agency or as an independent contractor? Could you take an internship or volunteer which would give you experience, but is likely to be unpaid. Then think about travelling and commuting. How far away from home are you prepared to work?

What kind of organization do you want to work for?

Think about the variety of organizations that are around – large or small, public or private? Then what about sector, such as, Finance, Education or Health?  Each will have its own culture and opportunities.

How much do you need to earn?

When looking for a job it is good to have an idea how much money you are looking for. But you also need to know how much money you need. Work out a budget and be clear about the style of life you want to lead.  How much money is it going to take to support it?  In terms of what you aspire to,  it is worth considering roles both slightly above and those slightly below your target. But be realistic and remember that if an organization wants you, they may be prepared to negotiate.

When you have the answers to these questions,you are ready to begin your job search – you can find help in Part 2 at this link,http://wisewolftalking.com/2012/07/12/job-search-part-2-where-are-you-looking/. If you need support getting to the answers email me – email address below – it just the kind of help I give my clients 

Wendy Mason is a Life and Career Coach.  She helps people have the confidence they need to be successful at work and to change career while maintaining a good work/life balance. You can email her at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

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