Job Search: Just starting out?

Job Search: Just starting out?

If you are just starting your job search what should you keep in mind?

Be open to possibilities.

Most job seekers look for a new job similar to the one they just left. This makes sense in lots of ways. Among other things, we tend to define ourselves by the work we do, so it is understandable that the kind of work we look for is that with which we have been associated. But this approach can be self-limiting. This might just be the time to consider other possibilities!

The skill set you have developed may meet the requirements of a number of different roles. What about the opportunities for self-employment? Or you may wish to use some of this time to add to your skill set through training, developing a hobby or some kind voluntary work.

Be prepared for a full-time commitment.

Successful job search takes time. Among other things, if you want to win a job today, you need to invest energy into lots and lots of research. For example, you need to do your homework on potential employers; what is happening in their marketplace and who are the key players? Also, if you want to tap into the hidden job market (those vacancies that are never advertised) you need to network, network, and network.

Be prepared to deal with rejection.

Getting the right job these days usually means bouncing back from lots of near misses. The secret is to learn from each one. Occasionally, you will need to accept that decisions are not wholly reasonable or just and it is best to take none of it too personally. Yes, sometimes you don’t get a job because you made a mess of the interview. Accept that and resolve to do better next time. If you were well fitted for a role you didn’t get then see it as their loss, not yours, and move on. There will be other roles and new possibilities to consider.

I wish all those starting out on or a continuing a job search this week every success.

If you are thinking about coaching, and we coaches really can add value to your job search, I would love to talk to you.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com
UK: +44 (0) 2081239146
US: +1 262 317 9016
Mobile: +44 (0) 7867681439 IM: wendymason14 (Skype)
Pre-order “The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters” from my Amazon page at this linkhttp://www.amazon.co.uk/Wendy-Mason/e/B00BEV22L4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

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Finding the Hidden Job Market; Contacting Employers Directly

Help-Wanted-Sign-S-7380Finding the Hidden Job Market; Contacting Employers Directly

 is a Career Coach and this is a tip from The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Friends and Influence Recruiters – pre-order on Amazon(US)Amazon (UK)

Most vacancies, particularly in the private sector, are never advertised. They are filled by people already known to the employer or known to a contact of the employer.  So of course it is worthwhile making yourself known. There is no reason why you should not contact an employer to ask about jobs available. If an employer can fill a job without advertising, it saves them time and expense. Even if they don’t have vacancies now and you make the right impression, they may contact you in the future.

Find out as much as you can about the organization before you approach them. Identify a suitable senior manager or professional and address your letter to them. Look for someone in a position of influence but outside HR. Then tailor your letter carefully to show your interest in the organization, tell them why you would like to work for them and how what you have to offer might meet their needs. Ask for an opportunity to talk to them to learn more about the organization and future opportunities. Offer to send your CV. Keep you letter simple, straight forward, polite and on one sheet. Check it very carefully for accuracy and typos.

Many people try to find out the name of person responsible for hiring new staff and write to them. But a direct approach to a senior executive in the department you want to work in is often more successful. If you have done your homework and show a real interest in the company you can find this direct contact can be a very good way in.

 is a Career Coach and this is a tip from The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Friends and Influence Recruiters – pre-order on Amazon(US)Amazon (UK)

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Get a Diploma or Certificate In Your Desired Career Field To Increase Your Self-Confidence

Get a Diploma or Certificate In Your Desired Career Field To Increase Your Self-Confidence

Tamara-M.-Williams_1405711 Today we have a guest post from Tamara M. Williams, an EzineArticles Platinum Level Expert Author. She publishes articles on various topics. Visit her profile page on EzineArticles to learn more.

When you study a new or advanced topic in an area of interest you increase your knowledge and skills. It is possible to study without earning an online diploma or certificate. However, having one makes it easier for you to increase your list of accomplishments. This shows your commitment and dedication to yourself and your career. In addition, it adds a great boost to your self-confidence. This furthers your personal and career development and increases your level of success in life.

E-Learning Providers

There are many blog posts, eBooks, webinars, training videos and a lot of other content on various career fields. These are easy to use and help you to quickly learn the topic that you have an interest in. However, an online course provides a more structured approach. By using them, you learn a wider variety of information in one convenient place. Some e-learning providers are universalclass.com, coursera.org, udemy.com and alison.com. They offer courses such as Social Media Marketing, Customer Service, Project Management, and Workplace Safety and Health.

Benefits of Online Courses

There are many benefits when taking online courses. Courses can last from a few weeks up to a few months, so you can choose one based on your free time. Some courses are self-paced which offers flexibility. Others are instructor-led which offers more guidance. They are also more convenient because you can get access to the materials 24/7s. Plus, you can communicate with the instructor and other students for help or to offer suggestions. It takes time and commitment to study, but doing so opens the way for career advancement.

Increase Your Self-Confidence

A certificate or diploma increases your list of accomplishments which builds your self-confidence.  Yourdictionary.com defines self-confidence as “a person’s belief or trust in their own ability”. Self-confidence increases your determination to take on new or challenging projects at work. You feel encouraged to ask for a promotion or apply for a new job or step into a new career field. It helps you to acknowledge mistakes or failures and learn from them. It allows you take more risks to meet your career goals. Therefore, getting qualifications in your career field increases your belief in yourself to succeed.

Completing online diplomas or certificates will help you learn valuable information and skills on various topics for your career field. This adds to your accomplishments and increases your self-confidence. Self-confidence will help you advance in your existing or new career, which will increase your level of success in life.

About The Author:

Tamara M. Williams is an EzineArticles Platinum Level Expert Author. She publishes articles on various topics. Visit her profile page on EzineArticles to learn more.

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Getting on With The Boss

handsGetting on With The Boss

 Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book; How to Win Friends and Influence Recruiters – pre-order on Amazon

So many people I work with or meet raise this as an issue.  So I’m returning to it again.

I don’t know anyone who at some point in their professional life hasn’t had some worries about establishing a good working relationship with their manager.

And remember folks that is what it is about; a good working relationship.

You don’t have to be best friends. You just need to establish a relationship that allows you to work constructively with each other.

With this relationship, as with others, at the heart lies a need for good communication. The reality is that not all managers are blessed with good communication skills. With some managers, they have the skills but, for one reason or another, are not choosing to use them effectively.

So, as a worker in a silent vacuum, you try to make sense of what is going on.

The super confident may well assume; “Well I must be doing well or she/he would say something.” But many of us are less than super confident, particularly when starting a new job. We assume no news is bad news. We may even start to interpret body language, and how the boss behaves towards others, as sending some kind of message for us. Often our interpretation and our assumptions are wrong.

If your manager has not opened up communication with you, then you need to open up communication with them.

First, take some time out to think about what you want to ask and what information you require to do your job well. Then think how to put your requests into words. Now, you are ready to book some time in your manager’s diary.

Pick a time when they are likely to be fresh but not immediately after they arrive in the office and need to check their in-tray. You don’t want them distracted by emails rather than listening to you. Always open the conversation by referring to some positive points about your job and the organization. Then, when you have their attention, present your points clearly but without personal criticism. Make sure they know that you appreciate how busy they are and make sure you thank them for their time.

Follow up by suggesting you have regular, but not necessarily frequent, touchdown meetings.

I am sure that if you prepare properly, you will handle this well and both you and your boss will be pleased you took the initiative.

I wish all those starting out on or a continuing a job search this week every success.

If you are thinking about coaching, and we coaches really can add value to your job search, I would love to talk to you.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com
http://wisewolfcoaching.com
UK: +44 (0) 2081239146
US: +1 262 317 9016
Mobile: +44 (0) 7867681439 IM: wendymason14 (Skype)
Pre-order “The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters” from my Amazon page at this linkhttp://www.amazon.co.uk/Wendy-Mason/e/B00BEV22L4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

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Leading a Team Through its Conflicts

Leading a Team Through its Conflicts

Career Coach and author of The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book due to be published in September 2014

When a new group comes together there may well be all kinds of tensions among them. They may begin to debate how they should go forward. What are the priorities going to be and who is going to take which role in the team? What systems and processes are going to be put in place? 

Differences of opinion and beliefs can lead to conflict and they may begin to jockey for position. Power struggles can break out, particularly if you have a number of strong personalities vying to lead. They may begin to challenge you as group leader and cliques may form. 

So what can you do? The team needs to be focused on its goals to avoid becoming distracted by relationship and emotional issues. Some compromises will need to be made and you will need to help them find the middle ground. 

A good way to start is to show them the benefits of what you are trying to do. There needs to be lots of communication. The group needs to understand the importance of the task, the processes needed and their roles. 

If all is going well, the group will move on to agree some “norms” for working together.

But if you still have tensions, set down the ground rules for group behaviour and get the group to agree that they should treat each other with respect. You will need to keep a close eye on the debate – if it is about ideas, that is a good sign and they can be left to work it out if time allows. But if the debate becomes personal then you will need to intervene. Don’t suppress conflict completely because the group will stagnate and not learn to work together very well. This is where planning social events can help so that individuals begin to see each other in a more rounded way. 

If necessary, tighten up the goals and targets. Get the group to focus very sharply upon them and the benefits which will be lost if people are not ready to compromise and reach agreement. If cliques have formed, try putting people to work with others outside their chosen subgroup so that new relationships can be established. 

With your leadership, the team will come together and meet their goals. 

I wish all those starting out on or a continuing a job search this week every success. 

If you are thinking about coaching, and we coaches really can add value to your job search, I would love to talk to you. 

Warm regards 

Wendy 
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com 
http://wisewolfcoaching.com 
UK: +44 (0) 2081239146 
US: +1 262 317 9016 
Mobile: +44 (0) 7867681439 IM: wendymason14 (Skype)

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Giving Feedback to an Unsuccessful Candidate

114671443_80_802Giving Feedback to an Unsuccessful Candidate

 is a Career Coach and Writer with Life Coaching Skills

In all kinds of situations you may need to give feedback to someone about something they have said or done. This could be an employee, a work colleague or a business partner. But here I had in mind giving feedback to a candidate after unsuccessful job interview.

1. Prepare for the discussion. Be clear about what you want to say and make sure you can support it with evidence.
2. During the discussion think before you speak! Don’t make ad hoc remarks that imply, for example, that you personally would have made a different decision.
3. Stay positive. This doesn’t mean not giving constructive criticism about gaps but do make sure you balance criticisms with clarity about what you did like.
4. Be specific. Avoid general comments and try to be as clear and simple as you can!
5. Focus on evidence presented of competence rather than the person and their personality.
6. Stay in the neutral ground emotionally but accept that it is reasonable for the candidate to feel disappointed.
7. Own the feedback. If you have been part of the interviewing panel, then own the feedback, it is about “we” not about “the panel.”
8. Empathize. Always put yourself in the other person’s shoes! Think how you would feel receiving the same information! No room here for humiliation!

I wish all those starting out on or a continuing a job search this week every success.

If you are thinking about coaching, and we coaches really can add value to your job search, I would love to talk to you.

Warm regards

Wendy
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com 
http://wisewolfcoaching.com
UK: +44 (0) 2081239146
US: +1 262 317 9016
Mobile: +44 (0) 7867681439 IM: wendymason14 (Skype)

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How To Do Well at Assessment Centres!

How To Do Well at Assessment Centres!

These are more tips from my new book called The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters. It is due to be published in September 2014. Email info@bluebirdhousebooks.com for more information

Here are my top tips for handling assessment centres

  1. Be Yourself! Work on the basis the assessors know what they are doing. They will be able to see through an act. Keep your wits about you and show your best but try to relax enough to let the real you shine through. You may want to use a simple relaxed breathing technique during the odd break.
  2. Know the criteria. Usually, the assessors will be assessing you against a predefined list of qualities and competencies for the job. For most public sector jobs you’ll probably know what these are before the event. In the private sector, openness can vary. But you should try to find out the criteria before the assessment centre. If you applied through a recruitment agency they should be able to help. At the very least, the job description will usually give you an indication of the qualities they are looking for.
  3. Manage your time carefully. Many candidates at assessment centres fail to do themselves justice because they run out of time in the exercises. Where you have to read a brief and then do an exercise afterwards, start by skim reading to get an idea of the issues. Then go back and study important points more carefully. Keep an eye on your watch and allocate your time carefully.
  4. Don’t put other candidates down. Remember at an assessment centre you are unlikely to be measured directly against each other. You are being measured against the criteria for the role. Scoring points off others in group exercises doesn’t make you look good. It makes you look like a non-team player and that is not likely to make the assessors warm to you. Your best strategy is usually to support, not to compete.
  5. Practice if you can. It really helps if you can run through possible exercises with someone you trust as preparation for the centre. You will find organizations that offer paid-for practice online.
  6. Listen carefully to all instructions. Know what you are doing and show you are doing it. Listen carefully to all instructions and show you are listening through your body language.
  7. Interact with the assessors. If there is an opportunity to interact with the assessors, say at lunch time, then make the most of it. But don’t be a nuisance and certainly don’t hog the limelight. You want to make an impression memorable for the right reasons.

These are more tips from my new book called The WiseWolf Job Search Pocket Book: How to Win Jobs and Influence Recruiters. It is due to be published in September 2014. Email info@bluebirdhousebooks.com for more information

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